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Fears and Phobias »

students-2-266x300Greetings,

In this issue, our contributors write about their fears and phobias.

Have a good read!

Lara, Hailee, and Jordan

The WWN Editorial Team

/!\Please note: the statement made in these articles do not reflect the view of Willamette University or the countries of the respective contributors./!\

Are You Afraid of the Dar… of the Ballot Box ? »

One of my passions in life–after eating cereals all day long on Sundays–is watching trailers. They are, I think, the best part of the movies themselves. In no time, they have to convince you to jump off your sofa and run to the movie theater. I believe that the more plausible the feelings delivered, the more likely you are to watch the complete version. Read the rest

Education Systems »

students-2-266x300Greetings,

In this issue, our contributors write about differences in the education systems in their nations.

Have a good read!

Lara, Hailee, and Jordan

The WWN Editorial Team

/!\Please note: the statement made in these articles do not reflect the view of Willamette University or the countries of the respective contributors./!\

The German Education System and the “Children’s Garden” »

What is there to know about the education system in Germany? A lot and it’s also quite complicated.
The public school system in Germany is more extensive than in other countries and there are many fewer private and parochial schools. Some alternative educational models, such as Waldorf and Montessori, are also integrated and a valid choice for parents. Read the rest

The Educational System in Argentina: Differences, Similarities and the Challenges Ahead »

The educational system in my home country is at times very different from the American system but there are still some similarities… In order to give you a general picture, I will include the briefing I found in the EducationUSA website which may be of great help. Read the rest

Public Opinion of the Government »

students-2-266x300Greetings,

In this issue, our contributors write about the public opinion of the government and competing government parties in their nations.

Have a good read!

Lara, Hailee, and Jordan

The WWN Editorial Team

/!\Please note: the statement made in these articles do not reflect the view of Willamette University or the countries of the respective contributors./!\

What is the public opinion of the government/competing governmental parties? »

Written by Liberty Siegle.

Note: I am studying abroad in Irkutsk, a Siberian city close to Mongolia. I am over 3,000 miles from Moscow, so bear in mind that my experience here varies dramatically from what a student in western Russia experiences.

Read the rest

Phony Abbott? »

 

Preface: I’m cautious of tackling the issue of “public opinion of Australian government.” For one, I’m not the greatest fan of our current Prime Minister Tony Abbott, nor am I aware of his latest moves of debauchery since I have been abroad. It’s also hard to generalise all of the public opinions towards our PM and his Liberal Party, but I will try to condense the general attitude of my demographic in this article. Read the rest

Seasons and Weather »

students-2-266x300Greetings,

In this issue, our contributors write about how the weather and seasons affect life in their nations.

Have a good read!

Lara, Hailee, and Jordan

The WWN Editorial Team

/!\Please note: the statement made in these articles do not reflect the view of Willamette University or the countries of the respective contributors./!\

„An ambigious relationship- the Germans and their weather“ »

If you’re out on the street anywhere in Germany, you’ll often overhear conversations like: „Heute schon wieder. Grau in grau. Nimmt das denn kein Ende?“ (Again today. Grey in grey. Does that never end?). If you’re still not sure what is meant by that, I’ll give it away. Yes- they are talking about the weather and complaining. Read the rest

How do the seasons affect your life? »

Sometimes, we get so used to our environment that we even forget how we interact with the surroundings and are influenced by them. Seasons are clearly one of the things I tend to overlook even though they affect almost every aspect of my life! Since I was young, I experienced a wide range of weather because Korea has very distinct four seasons: spring, summer, autumn and winter. Read the rest

How the Seasons affect our Lives, or: A Declaration of Love to Summer (aka the best season ever!) »

IMG_20150319_160742638_HDR (1)Long, muggy evenings spent sitting outside and enjoying a drink, without the need for lights. Hot days at the lake/beach, without the need for a towel when you come out of the water. Taking walks or bike rides through nature until sundown, without the need for many layers of clothes. Being able to step outside the house, without the need to think about grabbing a jacket, and the sun shining into your face as soon as you step out. Pure, balking heat surrounding you in the streets. Read the rest

Nothing New Under the Sun? »

Hello, there!

Let me introduce you to the most used conversation topic in the whole world: the weather! It doesn’t matter if you are stuck in a broken elevator with a complete stranger or if you are just trying to flirt – or both at the same time, weather is the key. Talking about the weather will always save you and you know it.
Read the rest

Introducing Meghan Cusick in DC »

My name is Meghan Cusick. I’m a junior Willamette student double majoring in Politics and Communications. And I am not on a typical abroad program. I have traveled time zones and flyover states in order to study in one of the most elusive, confusing, troubling, and distant places from the American people: Washington, DC.

Read the rest

Law Enforcement In DC – An American Perspective »

The first time I went out in DC with some of the people in my seminar class, I heard one of those stories that you hope couldn’t be real. You hope the media invents these stories to stir up trouble. You hope there was another side. We’ve seen, in far more severe cases than the story I’m about to tell, that sometimes the world is just an unfair place and people, especially police, have the potential to be as bad as the media says they are.

Read the rest

Hallo from the Netherlands! »

Hallo! My name is Kristin and I am currently studying at Radboud University in Nijmegen, Netherlands. Nijmegen is a small city of 160,000 located on the eastern side of the country, close to Germany. Read the rest

New International Students and Culture Shock »

students-2-266x300Greetings,

Our second Willamette World News issue of the semester is out!  Our new international students have written an introductory article in which they talk about themselves and their initial culture shock they experienced when they arrived.

Have a good read!

Lara, Hailee, and Jordan

The WWN Editorial Team

/!\Please note: the statement made in these articles do not reflect the view of Willamette University or the countries of the respective contributors./!\

Hello from Grahamstown, South Africa »

Hey!

My name is Ryan de Villiers and I’m from South Africa. And yes, I am white and speak English. I am a study abroad student for the spring semester here at Willamette and am thoroughly enjoying it thus far. I am from Rhodes University in an even smaller town than Salem, Grahamstown, which is in one of the most beautiful provinces in South Africa, the Eastern Cape. At the moment it is probably around 90 degrees Fahrenheit back home, so I am definitely missing the weather but Oregon has surprised me with its sunny days. I am a Theatre and Politics major (in South Africa it is necessary to double major) and the courses here at Willamette are proving to be very stimulating and interesting. Read the rest

Why don’t you Americans wear socks and use umbrellas? »

My name is Yichen Fu and I am from Zhuhai, China. Zhuhai is a seaside city in southern China. Compared to other cities in China, for example Beijing, it is considered a small city. Growing up there, I learned to appreciate the beauty of nature and the quietness of life.
Read the rest

Hello from Sweden! »

My name is Cajsa Nolskog and I’m one of the international students at Willamette this semester. I’m originally from Skövde, Sweden, but have lived in Norrköping the last year and a half before coming to Salem. I take every chance I get to live abroad, so I lived in a couple of places around the world with my first long time stay abroad in Charlottesville, Virginia. There, I went to high school for one year. That’s seven years ago now, and I thought it was time to come back to the US!
Read the rest

Hello lovely readers of WWN, this is Melody from Australia! »

I have encountered many people who are dismayed that I do not greet them with “G’day”, a salutation you will not hear from anyone under the age of 65 back home. I do apologise for not adhering to this Aussie stereotype, but do not panic, I do use “mate” very abundantly!
Read the rest

Hey there, or in German: Hallo! »

My name is Jasmin Egger and I am studying at Willamette during the spring semester of 2015. I am from Austria. Austria – in Europe – is close to Germany and Switzerland, so from the stereotypical American point of view, it is close to everywhere else in Europe, too! Austria should also not be mistaken with Australia because, unfortunately, we don’t have kangaroos or koalas (which, by the way, are my favorite animals!) there. Read the rest

Austria and The Sound of Music: Where the Hills Are Alive »

Long before I came to the United States from Graz, a relatively small town in Southern Austria and birth place of, among others, one Arnold Schwarzenegger, I was fully aware that I would get confronted with The Sound of Music. I’ve prepared myself. I’ve been on this side of the world twice before, and it really does seem as if this little movie haunts me and my country. It is, indeed, a difficult relationship we have with it.
Read the rest

A thing or two about those oh-so-wonderful culture shocks »

When I was eighteen I moved from Finland to the UK. I was about to start my studies in Liverpool and I was so unbelievably excited and happy and excited, which left no room for the fear of the unknown. I arrived in Liverpool one September day and got instantly hit by a sweet and musky smell, which I have since associated with the UK – a scent resembling the combination of Haribos and an uncleaned floor carpet (or if you’re walking through town at night it’s beer and a strong cleaning product). Read the rest

Law Enforcement »

students-2-266x300Greetings,

Our first Willamette World News issue of the semester is out! In light of the current controversy and movements against police brutality, we have invited our returning international students to write about the law enforcement in their nations, specifically how they are viewed by society and their interactions with civilians.

Have a good read!

Lara, Hailee, and Jordan

The WWN Editorial Team

/!\Please note: the statement made in these articles do not reflect the view of Willamette University or the countries of the respective contributors./!\