Willamette World News

Willamette World News

  • Calendar

    April 2011
    S M T W T F S
    « Mar   May »
     12
    3456789
    10111213141516
    17181920212223
    24252627282930
  • Recent Posts

  • Categories

  • Archives

RSS Feed for This PostCurrent Article

My country, my language.

Jairo.jpg
Language is in constant movement and it changes according to the user’s needs or context. There are different factors that influence language including internet, television and the possibility to access many sources of information in a short amount of time has made language a subject of change and something that responds and adapts to various situations.


Spanish is so different depending on the place, the users, the context and the education of the people that it is difficult to mention specific forms or changes about it. However, a general overview can be made and some examples can be provided to exemplify the variations in the language.
One factor influencing language is the adoption of foreign words either to make the communication easier or because of the difficulty of translating the original words into Spanish.
These words are some examples of this case: boy scout, bunker, bye, comfort, Disc Jockey, manager, tour…
Another important factor that has changed language is the internet, and especially online chat- this tool represents a new way of communication which requires fast interaction between users, so people tend to use these acronyms and abbreviations to save time.
TQM: Te quiero mucho
Kmo sts: Como estas
A2: Adios
T keo muxo: Te quiero mucho
X fa: por favor
Xatr: Chatear
Mñtvo: Mañana te veo
Gcs: Gracias
Music also has an influence on language. When people listen to a song, even if the lyrics are grammatically wrong, they adopt the new form of speaking and start using some words and expressions that do not exist in formal language.

BARACUNATANA LIRYCS
No llevo para mi casa
una mujer baracunatana
porque pueden pensar
que estoy loco locolocolo
anoche te ví
había otro que te chequeaba
montaste su moto
te brindó chicle tambien galleta
prendió su motoneta
y te marchaste con el mono
del jean el overol y la chaqueta
lalalala lalalala
por eso tu eres garulla retrechera
abeja bergaja fulera guaricha
baracunata cucharami
baracunata baracunatana
y con el mono de la moto
eran 9 que tenía
y le ponían serenata
No llevo para mi casa
una mujer baracunatana
porque pueden pensar
que estoy loco locolocolo
anoche te ví
había otro que te llegaba
montaste su moto
te brindó chicle tambien galleta
prendió su motoneta
y te marchaste con el mono
del jean el overol y la chaqueta
lalalala lalalala
por eso tu eres garulla retrechera
abeja bergaja fulera guaricha
garosa morronga farisea gorzobia
baracunata cucharami
baracunata baracunatana
y con el mono de la moto
eran 9 que tenía
y le ponían serenata
All the highlighted words are those words that are not accepted in formal language; however after this song become a hit everyone started using these words when they want to insult a woman.
Slang in Colombia is also commonly used among young people in schools and with their friends. Some words have a clear background while others just appear out of nowhere and nowadays they are commonly used in almost every situation. Translating these phrases is kind of difficult so I will provide the slang with the formal definition in Spanish; hopefully you will understand the meaning.
A LA EFE: Con seguridad, a la final.
A LO BIEN: Según las reglas.
ABRIRSE: Irse de inmediato, esconderse.
ARMAR: Poner problema.
ARREGLAR: Matar.
BALÍN: Bala.
BANDERIAR: Poner en evidencia, señalar, molestar.
BANDOLA: Banda, grupo que se asocia para actividades delincuenciales.
CALENTURA: Violento, peligroso.
CAMBUCHE: Cama, lugar para dormir
CAMELLO: Trabajo, ocupación.
CRUCE: Negocio, favor, actividad ilícita.
CUCHA: Madre, anciana.
CULEBRA: Enemigo.
CUQUITA: Bonito.
CHACHOS: Muchachos.
CHANGÓN: Escopeta recortada.
CHIMBA: Bonita, algo que gusta.
CHINOS: Muchachos.
FULL: Lleno.
GAGA: Metralleta.
GALLADA: Grupo de muchachos.
GANSO: Persona que cae a la cárcel por error o que paga el delito por otro.
All these expressions and words make learning Spanish really hard, especially for children who are exposed everyday to these types of situations. Fortunately, there are some strategies to educate people and children. It is a campaign designed to teach the correct use of Spanish through cartoons, personally I remember this show and how helpful it was at school.

I hope you have learned something new! If you are planning to visit Colombia you better practice the expressions until you learn them by heart. If not, then just forget them because nobody in the world uses them outside Colombia; that’s why we are the best and our country es una chimba.

Trackback URL




Sorry, comments for this entry are closed at this time.