Faculty Resource Blog

Organizations

ORGANIZATIONS

COFLT – The Confederation in Oregon for Language Teaching

http://cofltoregon.ning.com/
The Confederation in Oregon for Language Teaching (COFLT), Oregon’s statewide association of second language professionals for all languages at all levels, immersion and non-immersion, works with educators statewide to improve language learning and teaching. COFLT promotes cooperation among colleagues, state agencies, the legislature and the public to make second language a reality for all Oregonians in the 21st century. Led by professionals who volunteer their time, COFLT shares an office and staff with the Oregon International Council (OIC). COFLT members automatically belong to the Pacific Northwest Council for Languages (PNCFL), in turn receiving a conduit to JNCL/NCLIS and ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Additional benefits for COFLT members include but are not limited to: two conferences in the Fall and the Spring, the Spectrum and Lingo(PNCFL) newsletters, numerous grant and student-scholarship opportunities, and much much more.

ACTFL – American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages
http://www.actfl.org/
ACTFL’s Mission:  To provide vision, leadership and support for quality teaching and learning of languages. ACTFL is a national organization dedicated to the improvement and expansion of the teaching and learning of all languages at all levels of instruction throughout the U.S. ACTFL and its affiliated organizations represent the educators who are committed to building language proficiency from kindergarten students through adult learners. We provide advocacy, professional development opportunities, resources and opportunities for members to interact and share ideas and experiences.

CALICO – Computer-Assisted Language Instruction Consortium
https://calico.org/
CALICO, the Computer-Assisted Language Instruction Consortium is an international organization dedicated to research and development in the use of computer technology in language learning: computer-assisted language learning (CALL). CALICO includes language educators, programmers, technicians, web page designers, CALL developers, CALL practitioners, and second language acquisition researchers–anyone interested in exploring the use of technology for language teaching and learning.
CALICO’s Annual Conferences provide a forum for discussions of state-of-the-art educational technology and its applications to teaching and learning languages. Each conference features preconference workshops, papers, software demonstrations, panels, and special interest group meetings for participants at all levels of expertise. Conference attendees have described CALICO’s conferences as “an excellent opportunity to network with others in the field” and “a great friendly ambiance combined with solid work.”

IALLT – International Association for Language Learning Technology
http://www.iallt.org/
Established in 1965, IALLT is a professional organization whose members provide leadership in the development, integration, evaluation and management of instructional technology for the teaching and learning of language, literature and culture. Its strong sense of community promotes the sharing of expertise in a variety of educational contexts.

SWALLT – Southwest Association for Language Learning Technology
http://swallt.org
The SouthWest Association for Language Learning Technology is a regional group of the International Assocation for Language Learning Technology (IALLT). They strive to keep all past, present and prospective members of IALLT and SWALLT informed and involved and up-to-date on news, events and activities in the field of language learning and technology.

CLAC – Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum
http://clacconsortium.org/
he Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum (CLAC) Movement intends to make global competence a reality for students and to create alliances among educators to share practices and find ways to incorporate an international dimension in curricula, and, more generally, to achieve internationalization goals. General principles of CLAC include:

  • A focus on communication and content
  • An emphasis on developing meaningful content-focused language use outside traditional language classes
  • An approach to language use and cross-cultural skills as means for the achievement of global intellectual synthesis, in which students learn to combine and interpret knowledge produced in other languages and in other cultures

Within this large framework, CLAC can take many forms, depending on specific content and curricular goals within a discipline. Among areas of interest to CLAC educators are:

  • Alternative models of education that foster the acquisition of cross-cultural competences
  • Frameworks that serve to build connections between comparative literature, cultural studies and area studies
  • K-16 articulation models
  • Content-based language instruction and the development of new content-based foreign language textbooks and discipline-specific learning materials and technology
  • Study abroad including programs focused on professional studies
  • Heritage learner programs
  • Service learning models in cross-cultural contexts

AATSEEL – American Association of Teachers of Slavic and Eastern European Languages
http://www.aatseel.org
American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages exists to advance the study and promote the teaching of Slavic and East European languages, literatures, and cultures on all educational levels.
The American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages (AATSEEL), founded in 1941, exists to advance the study and promote the teaching of Slavic and East European languages, literatures, and cultures on all educational levels, elementary through graduate school. While the largest proportion of its activities and members concentrate in the area of Russian, AATSEEL has from the beginning stressed that it embraces all Slavic and East European languages, literatures, linguistics and cultures. AATSEEL holds an annual conference in January of each year; its publications include the Slavic and East European Journal(four times a year) and the AATSEEL Newsletter (four times a year).