The Twelfth Annual Northwest Undergraduate Conference on the Ancient World

April 22, 2017

The Classical Studies Program at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon, is hosting a one-day undergraduate conference. We envision this conference as an opportunity for talented undergraduates to present their work, for example a BA thesis or outstanding seminar paper, in a 15-minute talk to an audience of undergraduates and their faculty mentors. Papers are welcome in any area of ancient studies, including language and literature, religion, history, philosophy, and material culture.

A catered buffet breakfast and lunch will be provided to all participants, and audio-visual facilities will be available.

ABSTRACT deadline is Monday, March 20, 2017.

Interested students should send an abstract of their paper electronically to the conference organizer, Prof. Mary R. Bachvarova (mbachvar@willamette.edu). The abstract should provide the following information: name, email address, name and email of the supporting faculty member, any audio-visual needs (PowerPoint, video, slide projector), title of the talk, and 300-word description of the talk. Conference acceptances will be emailed within a few days after the deadline.

Further information will be posted on the website of the Willamette University Classical Studies Program (http://www.willamette.edu/cla/classics/conference/index.php), or you may contact the conference organizer, Prof. Mary R. Bachvarova.

Mar
16
Filed Under (Classics) by rhdell on 16-03-2017

Interested in learning about computer coding, especially as relevant for classics? Check out this new course offered by Paideia.

http://us7.campaign-archive2.com/?u=cbecc65905444671eb87e6e43&id=0d82077f3f&e=cba6890acd

The Paideia Institute is thrilled to announce an additional special course offering, Coding for Classicists, to its spring semester of Telepaideia, our series of online courses. Paul Hudson, inventor of the well-known Latin app, “SPQR,” will be the course instructor.

Course Description:

This unique course is designed to bring together two very different disciplines in one place, with the goal of helping you get a working confidence with coding in as short a time as possible. As a classicist, you will already be familiar with both close reading of texts and the need to correlate data across many sources, but without the aid of computers it’s difficult to do both well. In this course you’ll be taught simple techniques for reading, parsing, analyzing, and filtering large amounts of classical text using code, then slowly expanding your skills to add a user interface. No coding knowledge is required to begin — you’ll be taught everything you need.

Classes begin on March 19th, and take place on Sundays at 3 pm EST.

See our website for more information or click the button below to enroll. Professional development credit and Continuing Education Units (CEU’s) are available.

Mar
07
Filed Under (Classics, Latin) by rhdell on 07-03-2017

Join us for an afternoon of celebration and catharsis over this turning point in Roman history. There will be themed food (such as pizza, salad, and cupcakes), sanguine drinks, and games involving effigies of Caesar!

The event will be held form 4:30 to 6:30 pm on Friday, March 17th in Ford 101. All are welcome to drop by during that time frame!

Please join us this Thursday afternoon!

As usual, this lecture is free and open to the public!

CASA Research Colloquium
The Battle of Alarcos (1195): Musealization Of a Medieval Battlefield

Dr. Mario Ramírez Galán (Universidad de Alcalá, Spain)


Thursday, March 9, 2017, 4:30 p.m.
Eaton 412, Willamette University, 900 Winter
Street, Salem, Oregon

The medieval battle of Alarcos (1195) was the last great victory of Moslem against Christian troops in Spain. Having received information that the Almohad caliph Yaqub al-Mansur was gravely ill in Marrakesh, King Alphonso VIII of Castile decided to attack the Almohad possessions in Spain. Spanish and Moorish troops clashed at the castle of Alarcos, which marked the southernmost extension of Alphonso’s realm. The battle ended in a decisive, yet ultimately short-lived victory for the Moors.

Today, the ruins of the Castle of Alarcos and the surrounding battle field are well known. The castle has been excavated, but the battle field has not yet been surveyed, and little has been done to attract visitors. Dr. Ramírez Galán will present the results of the castle’s excavations, suggest a reconstruction of the different stages of the battle, and discuss how the battle field could be preserved so that modern visitors could walk through the site and experience the battle as it evolved.

Alarcos (Ciudad Real), Julio 2003.- Imagen aérea del Parque Arqueológico de Alarcos en Ciudad Real.

Note to AIA members: This is an afternoon research talk in Eaton Hall 412, not in the Law School.

Feb
14

Off the northernmost tip of Scotland lies the Orkney Islands where it is said that if you scratch its surface Orkney bleeds archaeology! This is nowhere truer than in the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site that is renown for some of the most iconic prehistoric monuments of Atlantic Europe: the great stone circles of the Ring of Brodgar and the Stones of Stenness; Maeshowe the finest chambered tomb in northern Europe; and the exceptionally well preserved 5,000-year-old village of Skara Brae.

Recent research and excavation in this area is radicalizing our views of this period and providing a sharp contrast to the Stonehenge centric view of the Neolithic. In particular, the stunning discovery of a Neolithic complex at the Ness of Brodgar that was enclosed within a large walled precinct is changing our perceptions. The magnificence of the Ness structures with their refinement, scale, and symmetry decorated with color and artwork, bears comparison with the great temples of Malta. These excavations are revealing a 5,000 year old complex, socially stratified, and dynamic society.

The Ness excavations were recognized by the American Institute of Archaeology as one of the great discoveries in 2009; named the 2011 Current Archeology Research Project of the Year; winner of the international Andante Travel Archaeology Award in 2012; and featured in cover article in National Geographic in 2014.

The excavations are directed by Nick Card who has lived and worked on Orkney off the north tip of Scotland for more than 25 years. He is Senior Projects Manager of the Orkney Research Centre for Archaeology, University of Highlands and Islands Archaeology Institute that he helped to establish. He is also a Member of Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site Research Committee; an Honorary Research Fellow of the University of the Highlands and Islands; Chair of the Ness of Brodgar Trust and Vice-president of the American Friends of the Ness of Brodgar.

 

Feb
09

“The Homeric narrator sees things that we, his audience, would have seen had we been on the scene, and things we would not have seen, e.g., the gods. Sometimes the narrative allows entities belonging to the unseen world to move into the seen world (or vice-versa): a god can make him-/herself visible to ordinary mortals, for example (epiphany). The quasi-theological rules that govern this arrangement are also rules for the visualization of the action, as proposed for tragic poets by Aristotle (Poetics ch. 17). In this talk I will explain and illustrate the Homeric rules as they normally operate, and then look at some places where they are put under strain. I will also consider some early evidence for audience awareness of the rules.”

Jan
31
Filed Under (Classics, Latin) by rhdell on 31-01-2017

Jan
24
Filed Under (Classics) by rhdell on 24-01-2017
The Office of Admissions is in need of current students who are Classics majors to meet with prospective students upon request. This will entail either a FREE LUNCH or FREE Bistro treats. If you are interested, please e-mail tkonik@willamette.edu and you will be put on their list to be contacted when necessary.
This is a great opportunity to grab some free food, meet with future bearcats, and grow as a leader and mentor.
Jan
16
Filed Under (Classics) by rhdell on 16-01-2017

Many of us have been asked what the possible use of a classics degree is. Here is one student’s answer.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/16/opinion/finding-myself-through-my-college-major.html?&moduleDetail=section-news-4&action=click&contentCollection=Opinion&region=Footer&module=MoreInSection&version=WhatsNext&contentID=WhatsNext&pgtype=article

Nov
22
Filed Under (Classics, Latin) by rhdell on 22-11-2016

Hello all,

Abiqua Academy is looking for an advanced Latin student to tutor one of their students taking high school Latin for next semester. Tutoring would be 1 to 3 hours per week, paying $20 per hour. It is preferred for the tutor to have their own transportation, though student can come to Willamette if necessary. Please email Lily Driskill at dr.lj.driskill@gmail.com if you are interested in setting up an interview in December.

Edit: This position has now been filled, but similar employment opportunities will be announced here in the future when they come up.