Filed Under (Uncategorized) by hkasler on 18-10-2015



I don’t know how I only just found this, but I just found the best article from The Onion.

“A group of leading historians held a press conference Monday at the National Geographic Society to announce they had “entirely fabricated” ancient Greece, a culture long thought to be the intellectual basis of Western civilization.

The group acknowledged that the idea of a sophisticated, flourishing society existing in Greece more than two millennia ago was a complete fiction created by a team of some two dozen historians, anthropologists, and classicists who worked nonstop between 1971 and 1974 to forge “Greek” documents and artifacts.”

Have fun studying your fabrications!



Filed Under (Uncategorized) by kpatters on 30-08-2015

Many are familiar with his physical labors, but this account of his emotional trials helps to humanize the man, the myth, the legend…

The Eight Serious Relationships of Hercules

Filed Under (Uncategorized) by sunderda on 15-10-2014

Check out this cool blog on the different parallels that can be drawn between the HBO drama and real Roman historical figures. Some really great cultural references going on in our media!


Filed Under (Uncategorized) by sunderda on 25-11-2013

I highly recommend reading this fascinating article that includes an awesome combination of science, history, and Classical studies.


Filed Under (Classics, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, Uncategorized) by oknorr on 08-10-2013

Did your reading of Homer, Vergil, or any other classical author happen to inspire your own poetry? If yes, the magazine Tellus out of the UK would love to see your work:

Tellus is an annual magazine which celebrates the rich use of the classical past in contemporary poetry; http://www.tellusmagazine.co.uk/. Poetry submissions for Issue 5 are warmly invited (deadline 15th November). Please do pass on this message to any colleagues or students to whom you think this would be of interest.

Filed Under (Uncategorized) by hkasler on 23-09-2013

I know that whenever I tell someone that I’m taking Latin, the immediate response is always, “say something in Latin!” Of course, I usually just say “veni, vidi, vici,” or something, but I know that I and many others want to know really how to speak conversational Latin. I recently uncovered a few links containing resources on conversational Latin, so here you go!
Simple Phrases!

This one’s just a preview of a book, but even the preview contains some pretty cool stuff. Unfortunately we don’t have it at Hatfield, but if you want it’s pretty easy to order through Summit.

In case you want to text your friends in Latin (email is too outdated, but that’s what they used for this article!)

Et tandem, I thought this was a fascinating video on the importance of conversational Latin!

Filed Under (Classics, Uncategorized) by sunderda on 23-09-2012

The Armenians of Istanbul: Church, Society, and Culture

  • 7:30pm Sept. 26th, College of Law, Paulus Lecture Hall (201)
  • Dr. Ron T. Marchese – University of Minnesota

The Deep Prehistory of Indian Gaming: The Perspective from Mesoamerica

  • 7:30pm Oct. 4th, College of Law, Paulus Lecture Hall(201)
  • Dr. Barbara Voorhies- University of California Santa Barbara

The 11th Century Decline of the Byzantine Empire Seen Through Contemporary Eyes

  • 7:30pm Oct. 16th, Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room
  • Dr. Dimitris Tsougarakis- Professor of Byzantine History, Willamette University

The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece: Greek and Roman Artworks Travel to Oregon!

  • 7:30pm Oct. 25th, College of Law, Paulus Lecture Hall(201)
  • Dr. Ann M. Nicgorski- Chair and Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Willamette University

Link to CASA events calendar

Filed Under (Uncategorized) by mrazloga on 28-02-2012

Filed Under (Classics, Uncategorized) by nshevche on 07-12-2011

… Has contributed to the latest volume of Mochlos. This is Mochlos IIC: Period IV. The Mycenaean Settlement and Cemetery: The Human Remains and Other Finds. A brief description of the book and a list of the rest of it’s contributors can be found here.

SALEM, Ore. —Alison Futrell, associate professor of Roman history at University of Arizona, will explore a number of representations of Boudica, from Roman to modern times on Nov. 10 at 7:30 p.m. in the Paulus Lecture Hall at the College of Law at Willamette University. Sponsored by the university’s Center for Ancient Studies and Archaeology and the Archaeological Institute of America, the lecture is free and open to the public.

Futrell’s lecture, “Remembering Boudica, Monuments of a Barbarian Queen”, will examine how the tribal queen Boudica, pushed beyond her limits by the excesses of the Roman colonizers, rose up to lead her people against the Roman Empire in A.D. 60. This revolt resulted in horrifying retributions that included the deaths of tens of thousands as multiple cities were burned to the ground (including what is now present day London). In the post-Roman period, Boudica became a key element in constructing British national identity.

Futrell’s research is guided by her interest in the symbols and rituals of power in the Roman Empire, with particular focus on the deployment of gender and material culture in imperial politics. She is the author of “Blood in the Arena: The Spectacle of Roman Power” and The Roman Games: Historical Sources in Translation”. She has appeared in a number of documentaries for the History Channel and A & E, including “Hannibal”, “The True Story of Gladiators”, “Cleopatra’s World: Alexandria Revealed,” and, most recently, “Boudica: Warrior Queen”.

Books will be available for sale, and the lecture will be followed by a book signing. For more information, contact Andrea Foust at (503) 370-6654.