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Русский Блог 10

Posted by: aschilba | February 28, 2008 Comments Off |

Здравствуите! Welcome to the first installment of the Russian language blog for the Spring semester. Today we will be talking about the unique features of Google Earth and how it can assist you in learning the Russian language. Then, I will show you another great site that has some great Russian literature podcasts.


Google Earth. This may be the coolest software out there. It not only shows great images and links to pictures, but also has numerous add-ins. For the purposes of learning Russian, this software is also useful. Let’s begin by downloading Google Earth for those of you that do not yet have it. Just go to Google, and search “Google Earth,” and follow the subsequent download steps.
After it is installed… Open it up and find your house. Press the Yellow push pin button to make it a permanently saved location on “Your Places.” Now, search for “The Kremlin.” This will zoom you to Moscow, Russia. Directly northwest to the Kremlin lies The Red Square. There are boatloads of pictures so choose some and work on reading the Russian captions. Although some captions will be in other languages besides English, the majority will be in Russian. After you have checkout The Kremlin and neighboring areas of Moscow, type into the search box “Lake Baikal, Russia.” As it is zooming East, notice just how immense Russia really is. It is huge. Let’s zoom back West by typing into the search box, “Saint Petersburg.” As you are exploring different sights around Russia, make sure and click on the purple Wikipedia link buttons that will open up a Wiki window. Next, we’ll check out “Murmansk, Russia.” Other fun things to look for are a Russian navel base way up North, and the nuclear submarines. Way cool.
The next resource I will be talking about today is a Russian podcast site. This site, run by UCLA Center for World Languages contains five episodes with 5 podcasts.
Episode 1: The Nose by Nikolai Gogol
Episode 2: Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, part 1
Episode 3: Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, part 2
Episode 4: Idiot by Feodor Dostoevsky
Episode 5 Silly Frenchman by Anton Chekhov
These podcasts are also useful because they have a .pdf text format that you can read along with. Although, it is a supplement to an intermediate Russian textbook which the LLC doesn’t have, it would behoove you to look at these regardless.
That about does it for this week, join me again for more great resources!
Sascha

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