Archive for the 'My Spanish Space' Category

Oct 08 2014

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aeinhorn

Getting to know your Language Assistants even better!

May you walk in beauty

By frojasga on Oct 2, 2014 in MexicoUSEdit

Saludos,

I was born in El Sauce, Michoacán, México. This is a small ranch five kilometers north of Cotija. The readers of this short piece may be aware that the country of Mexico is composed of 31 states and one federal entity, known as El Distrito Federal (Federal District) also known as la Ciudad de México. The Mexican state from whence more immigrants have come to the USA is Chihuahua; number two on that list is Michoacán. A poor economy is the primary reason for immigration from one country to another practically anywhere on planet earth. Mexico is a very mountainous, arid, land. Only 7% of the country is considered fertile. The state of Nebraska alone produces more corn than the country of Mexico. Illinois and Iowa in that order produce more corn than the Cornhusker state. Granted, not all the crop is utilized or grown for human consumption (cattle feed and gasoline additives). Wealth and power in México is controlled by the elite, roughly 2% of the population. We are speaking about a country of 110 million individuals. The disparity between wealthy and poor is simply astounding.

In March of 1974 when my family and I crossed the U.S.-Mexican border and came to live in Parkdale, Oregon. I was a little over two years old at this time. I grew up in Hood River and Wasco Counties of Oregon. Some may say I am an anomaly, as I maintained my mother tongue as I acculturated to life in the U.S. Historically, most immigrants become English dominant or monolingual during the second or third generation. The pressure of society for newcomers to learn and speak only English has lessened in most urban areas in the last ten years, in my estimation. In fact, I have witnessed a tidal wave of young people engage in the active and eager participation of learning a second (or more) language. In rural areas, the immigrant communities, especially the children, are strongly “encouraged” to speak English and to not speak their first language. Children are not fools. They will do what it takes to be accepted by those around them. It takes a persistent soul to maintain two or more languages in the face of adversity. It is fairly rare for individuals to maintain their first language given that the k-12 educational system has focused its instruction in English. Simply speaking one language does not signify that a person has a high degree of mastery. Study is what it takes to improve one’s language skills. This is a process of life-long work if the participant cares to undertake the challenge.

I look forward to meeting more students, faculty and staff at Willamette University. I am thrilled to be a part of the World Languages Studio as a new Spanish Language Assistant.

May you walk in beauty (Navajo saying),

Fernando Rojas-Galván

WLS

Willamette University

Hola Willamette

By mtorres on Oct 2, 2014 in Argentina

Hi everybody! this is Matias Torres and I am the Spanish language assistant this year at Willamette thanks to the Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistant program and  Willamette University. First I am going to tell you a little bit about myself. I am 29 years old and I am originally an English teacher in Argentina. I work at four different places there. I teach English language and literature in English in two bilingual high schools and I also teach two classes (English Language II and Children and Young Adult Literature) at a Teacher Training College. I also teach business English and I am the interpreter and translator at a company that produces and exports grape juice concentrates.

Even though I got my teaching degree in 2009 I have been teaching for 9 years now and last year I decided that I was going to apply for a scholarship to teach and study abroad. The process was not easy at all but it was worth the effort! Only 23 teachers out of 80 were selected to participate in the program and I was very lucky to be selected by Willamette to be a language assistant here.

In Argentina, I live in a province called Mendoza, which is located in the Midwest of Argentina. Mendoza is a very famous province for the wine production, So much so that some years ago it became the eighth Wine Capital total of the world! Here is a video that you can see to get to know little bit more about what wine represents to Mendoza.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nd77kB7Hvpo

Mendoza Capital Mundial del Vino

As regards traveling abroad, this is my second time in the US. The first time I was living in Wyoming for five months on another exchange program in 2007. After we finished with the program I traveled with my friends to many parts of the United States. That trip really marked my life since I developed a taste for traveling. After that, I have been to some countries in Latin America and to a couple more in Europe as well.

I am really happy to be here and I hope I can help as many people as possible! Hope to see you around!

No responses yet

Sep 13 2012

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imiranda

Who am I?

I grew up in a town that is fourteen thousand feet above sea level. The place is called, Potosi, located in Bolivia, South America. Somebody once said Potosi is “the Tibet of the Americas.” The city, which is cold all year round, is the opposite of the Amazon (temperature wise and altitude) – also in Bolivia. Potosi is the place were I started my academic career; from elementary to high school. As soon I finished high school, I moved to Cochabamba, to continue my education. The University of San Simon there become my Alma Matter, there I studied economics. In 1997 I moved to Germany where I studied the language (German) and experienced the culture for more than two years. In 2000 I arrived in the United States, at that time I did not know any English, so I took one semester of intensive English class at Parkland College in Champaign, Illinois and followed two years of general education classes at the same institution. By 2004, I transferred to Eastern Illinois University in Charleston, Illinois, where, in 2006, I graduated with Bachelor of Arts in Foreign Languages. In 2008 – 2009 I attended the Masters in Spanish Program at the University of Oregon, and currently I am an MBA student at Texas A&M University.
Growing up, studying economics, and working in Bolivia; traveling to some Latin American, Asian, and European countries, being in Germany for two years, and currently living and studying in the United States make me a walking example of cultural interaction who wants to share and transmit his experiences.

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Apr 17 2012

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Catalina Velez

Fiesta Latina este jueves en Cat Cavern

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Feb 27 2012

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Catalina Velez

Practica tu español en marzo

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Dec 12 2011

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Catalina Velez

¡Felices Fiestas!

Filed under My Spanish Space

One response so far

Oct 30 2011

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Catalina Velez

Día de los muertos

Filed under My Spanish Space

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Sep 30 2011

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Catalina Velez

Spanish Tutoring

Filed under My Spanish Space

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Oct 20 2010

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nshevche

Latin American Film Festival…

hola!

I’m glad to share with you a great experience that a group of students and me had last Sunday.

We went to a Latin American Film Festival in Portland as a Cultural Spanish event which was promoted by the Spanish Department. First, we went to the professor’s Julie Veltman house who was very generous and invited us to have lunch before the movie. We had such a great time because we shared just a little bit about us. Then, we moved to watch the movie “Solo quiero caminar” (Just walking) at Broadway Metro Plex. It was a Mexican and Spanish movie which the main character was Diego Luna (Mexico). It was a drama and action movie which was so intense. Besides, all of us liked a lot. When we came back, it was cool because we shared things about the movie and us. I think that that Sunday I will remember as one of the different days here in the States with great people.

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Oct 14 2010

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nshevche

TRABALENGUAS – TONGUETWISTERS

¿Se te traba la lengua? ¿Se te lengua la traba? ¿Se te lasengua la baba?… Los trabalenguas son juegos de palabras con sonidos difíciles de pronunciar juntos.

Lo interesante de los trabalenguas está en poder decirlos con claridad y rapidez, aumentando la velocidad sin dejar de pronunciar ninguna de las palabras. 

Primero empezaremos con los fáciles después subirá el nivel de dificultad. 

IMAGINANDO LO INMAGINABLE

GEMA IMAGINABA

UNA IMAGEN DE SU IMAGINACION

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SORULLO QUIERE LO SUYO

LO TUYO ES TUYO

DICE SORULLO

SUELTA LO QUE NO ES TUYO

SORULLO QUIERE LO SUYO

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CONFUSO CONFABULABA UNA CONFUSA

CONFABULACION,

CONFUNDIDO NO CONFIABA EN LA CONFUNDIDA CONFABULACION,

QUE ACABABA DE CONFABULAR.

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NADIE SILBA COMO SILVIA SILBA

PORQUE EL QUE SILBA COMO SILVIA SILBA

SILVIA LE ENSEÑO A SILBAR

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YO NO QUIERO QUE TU ME QUIERAS

PORQUE YO TE QUIERO A TÍ,

QUERIÉNDOME O SIN QUERERME

YO TE QUIERO POR QUE SÍ.

**********************************

EL REY DE CONSTANTINOPLA ESTA CONSTANTINOPLIZADO

CONSTA QUE CONSTANZA, NO LO PUDO DESCONSTANTINOPLIZAR

EL DESCONSTANTINOPLIZADOR QUE DESCONSTANTINOPLIZARE AL REY DE CONSTANTINOPLA,

BUEN DESCONSTANTINOPLIZADOR SERÁ

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CANSADAS CARGADAS RAPADAS MARCHABAN LAS CHAVAS,

CALLADAS, CALMADAS BANDADAS DE GATAS LAS RATAS CAZABAN,

LAS RANAS CANTABAN LLAMABAN SALTABAN Y AL SALTAR SANABAN DE SU MAL ASTRAL

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QUE EL BEBE CESE DE BEBER LECHE FRENTE A LA TELE,

QUE BESE EL PELELE, QUE ME DE ESE EJE QUE LE DEJE

Y QUE SE ENTERE DE LO QUE PENSE.

***************************************

CHANGO CHINO REFLICHADO

PORQUE CHIFLAS A LA CHINA

CHANGO CHINO RECHIFLADO RECHIFLADOR

QUE A LA CHANGA CHINA REFLICHADA CHIFLAS

CHANGO CHINO RECHIFLADO RECHIFLADOR

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EL AJO PICO A LA COL

LA COL PICO AL AJO

AJO COL Y CARACOL

CARACOL Y COL CON AJO

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SI CAMARON COMEMOS,

Y NOS ENCAMARONAMOS,

COMO NOS DESENCAMARONAREMOS?

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PARANGARICUTIRIMÍCUARO,

DESENPARANGARICUTIRIMICUARE

EL QUE LO DIGA SERÁ UN BUEN

DESANPARANGARICUTIRIMICUARIZADOR

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YO COMPRE POCAS COPAS

POCAS COPAS YO COMPRE

COMO YO COMPRE POCAS COPAS

POCAS COPAS YO PAGUE

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TRES TRISTES TIGRES

TRAGABAN TRIGO EN TRES TRISTES TRASTOS

SENTADOS TRAS UN TRIGAL.

SENTADOS TRAS UN TRIGAL,

EN TRES TRISTES TRASTOS

TRAGABAN TRIGO TRES TRISTES TIGRES.

***************************************

CUANDO CUENTES CUENTOS

CUENTA CUANTOS CUENTOS CUENTAS,

PORQUE SI NO CUENTAS CUANTOS CUENTOS CUENTAS

NUNCA SABRÁS CUANTOS CUENTOS CUENTAS TÚ.

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PABLITO CLAVÓ UN CLAVITO

EN LA CALVA DE UN CALVITO.

EN LA CALVA DE UN CALVITO,

UN CLAVITO CLAVÓ PABLITO.

********************************************

SI TU GUSTO GUSTARA DEL GUSTO

QUE GUSTA MI GUSTO,

MI GUSTO GUSTARÍA DEL GUSTO

QUE GUSTA TU GUSTO.

PERO COMO TU GUSTO

NO GUSTA DEL GUSTO

QUE GUSTA MI GUSTO,

MI GUSTO NO GUSTA DEL GUSTO

QUE GUSTA TU GUSTO.

***********************************

Si fuiste capaz de pronunciar al menos 10 trabalenguas correctamente y puedes probarlo envíame un mensaje y te daré un superhiperrecontragrandioso premio, bueno tal vez no sea superhiperrecontragrandioso, pero si será un premio.

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Sep 16 2010

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nshevche

El Grito de la Independencia! Mexican Independence Day.

Grito de Dolores

Mural depicting the Grito de Dolores, by Juan O'Gorman.

Cry of Dolores — battle cry of the Mexican War of Independence from Spain, first uttered by Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, parish priest of Dolores (now Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato state), on Sept. 16, 1810.

Hidalgo was involved in a plot against the Spanish colonial government, and, when the plot was betrayed, he decided to act immediately. After arming the people, he addressed them from the pulpit, encouraging them to revolt. The exact text of this most famous of all Mexican speeches is not known, and a wide variety of “reconstructed” versions have been published, but he may have said, in essence, “Long live Our Lady of Guadalupe [symbol of the Indians' faith], death to bad government, death to the gachupines [the Spaniards]!” Hidalgo amassed a large popular mob-army, but after much reckless pillage and bloodshed the movement was suppressed and Hidalgo himself was captured and executed on July 31, 1811. Hidalgo’s “cry” became the cry of independence. In commemoration, each year on the night of September 15—the eve of Mexican Independence Day—the president of the republic shouts a version of “el Grito” from the balcony of the National Palace in Mexico City: “Viva México! Viva la Independencia! Vivan los héroes!” The ceremony is broadcast throughout the country and is repeated in smaller scale in many towns and villages.

[excerpted from "Grito de Dolores." Encyclopædia Britannica <http://search.eb.com/eb/article-9038161>.]

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